Fish Farming in Gabon

Fish farm market Gabon — Renovating an old fish farm in Franceville area

  • Although the entire market in Gabon is rather small, as compared to other countries in W. Africa, the country has a larger middle class sector and foreigners with relatively high purchasing power.

  • Its main cities are Franceville and Libreville, but some other small towns can be a target for the farm’s products. Additional markets may be in Congo, its neighboring country that can demand quality products.

    The overall fish production in Gabon was estimated by the FAO stat at 32

    thousand Mt/Annum of catch fish, and an additional 160 Mt/Annum were

    aquaculture.

  • Market surveys in Gabon were carried out during the current & past visits. Three main market locations were examined:  Libreville, Franceville and Lambarene.

  • Lambarene is located on the Ogooue River, where the river is spread over a wide area.

  • The city has an active fishing industry, carried out by small boats, mainly fresh water catch. Most of the fish found on deck were tilapia, which is called Carpe locally.

    Much of the catch is cleaned and shipped to Libreville where itis sold in the markets.

Posted on

Products & Methods

Fish Farming Consulting and Aquaculture Experts Services

Choosing the right products and production technique can be a vital decision making for the success of your new initiative.The different fish species, such as tilapia, catfish, trout carp, and other spices shrimps, which mast fit to the market demand, country’s regulations and climatic conditions.

The appropriate production methods can make great differences of the initial investment and day by day operation costs. Such method must be decided with great care and consideration to the type of fish, environmental conditions, water situation on the site and many more factors.

Aquaculture fish type:

Tilapia

Catfish

Carps

Shrimp

Click on any picture to learn more about case studies & Services:

Earth ponds and cages
Tilapia Farming

Growing fish in cages system
Cages

Catfish Farming implementation
Catfish Farming

Ponds Aquaculture Projects
Earth Ponds

Posted on

Community Fish Farm

COMMUNITY FISH FARM

Tilapia Catfish and Carps Farming

By Uri Ben Israel an Aquaqulture expert

Introduction

Fish is the main source of animal protein in Africa, of which tilapia & catfish have been predominant. An ever growing surge in worldwide demand for these two species creates immense opportunities. This is a tremendous business opportunity that can benefit many Africans within a short period.

The Community Farming Initiative

Small scale aquaculture farming (family fish farm) brought more and more attention worldwide. Community farming relies on the family working capacity for daily operation that relying on central powerful data support and supply of inputs.

Small scale aquaculture farming (family fish farm) is bringing more and more attention worldwide. Community farming depends on a family working capacity for daily operation, supply of inputs and powerful central data support.

The initiative will set its production system among families who are living around water sources. Using small modular rearing ponds or any other system (cages concrete ponds etc.), a family could operate a number of cages/ponds according to its available land. Each family will be supported by the center unit that supplies raw material, serves, and purchases fish for processing and marketing.

A management and supporting center will operate the fingerlings hatchery to supply the farmers; feeding center, laboratory, extension service processing plant, cold storage rooms, marketing, distribution, equipment store, credit assistance and other elements for integrating business.

Operating as star and satellites, the operation will involve extensive relations not just between the center unit and families, but with local equipment and feed suppliers, research and extension officers from the ministry of Agriculture and potential customers.

Community Farm in Africa (Cages & Earth ponds)

Share

Implementation

The initiative design as rolling project, starting an initial pilot, which will involve and support from a few dozen and up to hundreds families, and aim to produce 5,000 t. fish per annum within the first four years.

The initial operation size and development will depend on local conditions and management policy.

Marketing

While part of the families’ production will used for self consumption and selling on the informal markets, most production will sell to the central processing plant and from there to export and to the local market.

Rational & Benefits

National/states Benefits:

  1. The project will supply work and income for more than 800 families that are involved in fish farming and approximately 600 workers (50% of them women) in the central service unit.
    Additional income and labour employment will be made for the suppliers of cages, equipment, feed etc.

  2. The initiative can be quickly implemented, start its production within a few months. Its short production cycles, which are less then 6 month, enable immediate impact on society.

  3. Enable quick economical impact in rural regions, at relatively small capital investment

  4. Reduce unemployment by supplying jobs to women and unskilled men in the process plant and fish rearing at their own yard.

  5. Improve foreign trade balance since most of its supply will comes from the local market.

  6. Reduce malnutrition, illnesses and medical cost.

Individuals Benefits:

  1. Enable poor families to set up their own small business – access to financing, markets and knowledge they can’t reach otherwise.

  2. Increase household’s income, improve welfare and wealth distribution

  3. Reduce food cost for family and external expenditure on food.

Posted on

Growing Fish in Caged System

Earth ponds and Cages

Growing fish in Cages system

By: Uri Ben Israel an Aquaculture expert

 

About cage farming tilapia

Raising fish in cages is a successful system used in many parts of the world.  It has replaced the traditional fish-growing method of earth ponds.  Its advantages are well recognized and it is widely spread all over the globe.  The first and most important advantage is the unlimited amount of water surrounding the cages. This unlimited water supply provides vast amounts of oxygen and running water, which is necessary for productive fish farming. In addition to that, the financial investment in such a system is much lower. This system of cages is simpler in daily operation in comparison to any other commonly used method of growing fish.

Site Selection and Placement of Cages

Large bodies of water tend to be better suited for cage culture than small ponds, because the water quality is generally more stable and less affected by fish waste. Exceptions are entropic waters rich in nutrients and organic matter. Small (1 to 5 acres) ponds can be used for cage culture, but provisions for water exchange or emergency aeration may be required. Cages should be placed where water currents are greatest, usually to the windward side. Calm, stagnant areas should be avoided. However, areas with rough water and strong currents also present problems.

Cages may be moored individually or linked in groups to piers, rafts, or lines of heavy rope suspended across the water surface. At least 5 meters should separate each cage to optimize water quality. The cage floor should be a minimum of 4 meters above the bottom substrate, where waste accumulates and oxygen levels may be depressed. However, greater depths promote rapid growth and reduce the possibility of parasitism and disease.

Grow-Out

The optimum fingerling size for stocking in final grow out cages is determined by the length of the growing season and the desired market size. The shorter the growing season, the larger the fingerlings must be at stocking. The use of male populations, which grow at 30-40% the rate of female populations, will result in larger fish, greater production and a reduction during the grow-out period.

Recommended stocking rate of tilapia fingerlings depends on cage volume, desired harvest size and production level, and the length of the culture period.

Water exchange is less frequent in large cages, and therefore the stocking rate must be reduced accordingly to fish size.

In tropical or subtropical regions with a year-round growing season, a staggered production system could be used to facilitate marketing by ensuring regular harvests, e.g., weekly, biweekly, or monthly. The exact strategy will depend on the number of cages available and the total production potential of the body of water.

Daily Operation

The cage system is serviced by a number of floating elements. The work between the cages is performed using motorboats. The use of motorboats serves several purposes: stocking fish into the cages, harvesting fish from the cages, extracting fish to the processing plant, transferring fish between the cages, feeding the fish and a vast number of other activities requiring movement between cages and shore. In addition, the motorboat is used to move the whole cage to the shore for harvesting, restocking or net preparation.

Stocking and harvesting fish can also be done by using special fish tanks on the service boats that contain water with oxygen, which comes from a special bottle of oxygen. The extraction of the fish is done part by hand and part by mean of a special device for the extraction of fish called the Archimedes Screw (Fish Elevator).

At a central point in the lake a wharf will be located to serve the cages by the boats. The wharf will be the main service point which will concentrate all cage related matters such as loading and unloading of food sacks, fuel station, repair and maintenance of the cages, exit point for the divers and a place to tie up the boats at night, and to leave extra floating technical elements.

From time to time, when the cages are emptied of fish, the nets will be transported to shore and washed in a specially designated facility. The fish farm will be serviced by a number of divers whose role will be to watch for damage to the cages, repair the nets in case of tears caused by predators or by any other causes.

Elevator for fish harvesting

Total production

Total production in cages increases as the stocking rate is increased. However, there is a density at which tilapia become too crowded and water quality within the cage deteriorates to a point that causes a decline in growth rates.  In cages, production should be limited to 30 -50 kg per cubic meter. Tilapia continues to grow above these levels at gradually decreasing rates, but they convert feed poorly, and the risk of loss due to oxygen depletion or disease is greater. For maximum turnover of mar

ketable fish, it is best to limit production to levels that do not depress growth. The total number of cages that can be deployed in a lake and therefore total fish production, is primarily a function of maximum allowable feeding rate for all cages in that body of water. The total feed input is related to number and size of fish in the cages (the biomass) and is limited by surface area of the pond.

Cages advantages and disadvantages

Some advantages are:

  • Flexibility of management

  • Ease and low cost of harvesting

  • Close observation of fish feeding response and health

  • Ease and economical treatment of parasites and diseases

  • Relatively low capital investment compared to ponds and raceways

Some disadvantages are:

  • Risk of loss from poaching or damage to cages from predators or storms

  • Less tolerance of fish to poor water quality

  • Dependence on nutritionally-complete diets

Leveling turned over – This may occur when anaerobic material flows up from the bottom of the lake, increasing toxic chemicals and lost of oxygen in the water.

 

  • The cage has three main parts. The outer part which floats on the water surface is made from 2-3 HDPE tubes. The diameter of the tubes is 250mm and they compose the upper floating base (as seen in the pictures) to which the fish growing net is tied.

  •  The second component is the net, where the fish are kept and grown. The net is completely submerged under water in a depth as determined by the farm’s requirements.

  • The third component is the mooring system located at the bottom of the lake which anchors the cage system to the designated location above water surface. The mooring system is anchored to the bottom with heavy anchors (as illustrated below). Out of this anchoring system are a number of cables protrude which connect to the cages and thus anchor the cage so that it cannot move. This system is designed to withstand strong winds and large waves. A number of mooring systems will be placed in several locations in the lake. Each of the systems will carry 24 cages. Each system will be named so it will be characterized and identified by the farm’s computer.

Posted on

Fish farming aquaculture market en cote d’ivoire (Ivory Coast)

The country of 25 million people is a great market for tilapia. Annual national  fish consumption is estimated at between 250,000 and 300,000 Mt with annual local catches averaging 80,000 Mt. (Anon. 1997). Considering that fish is comparatively cheaper than meat, most people are able to afford it. In 2001,  about 67 percent of the annual average per capita fish consumption of 13.2 kg. was provided from imports. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Figures from the FAO data base reveal that in 2012, fish catch and aquaculture production in the country was estimated at 75,611 and 3,729 Mt  respectively, making the total production 79,331 Mt/Annum. Based on the FAO figures, with about 67% of market consumption coming from imports, the total fish market in Ivory Coast is calculated at approximately 240,000 Mt/annum.

 

Another area that has been successful for Ivory Coast exports imports is  fishing.  In fact, the largest tuna fishing port has been in operating at Abidjan since 1964. Every year, approximately 100,000 tons of tuna are processed. In addition, commercial fishing for tuna and sardines accounts for much of the economy, and fish hatcheries have been established in Korhogo, Bamoro, and Bouake. Economy Watch

 

Posted on

Projects

Alphalapia’s team of experts were active for many years in the aquaculture industry. These activities were started at the early 70’s where an earth pond fish farm was rebuilt and upgraded to modernize an intensively cultured kibbutz in Bet Alpha, Israel.

  • Ghana Fish Farm
  • Brazil Fish Farm
  • Fish Farming in Nigeria
  • fish farm in Jamaica
  • Togo fish farm survey
  • Ecuador fish farming
  • Vietnams fish farm surve

 


Posted on

Our People

Uri Ben Israel

CEO

Uri Ben Israel is a senior fish farming consultant and is widely recognized as a leading consultant in the fish farming business. He now has over thirty-five years of experience in fish farming and has worked on many projects worldwide. He has extensive experience in developing commercial production methods for the intensive and semi-intensive culture of fish farming in the tropics. His practice includes consultation in farm design, technological innovation, production methods, disease control, training, and processing- plant design. In addition, he has extensive experience in operations and general project- management issues.

Mr. Ben-Israel got his start, working for 16 years on the Bet-Alfa (Israel) Fishing Industries farm, working his way to management. In the interim he graduated from the Ruppin Institute (Business Administration), went on to earn diplomas in Aquaculture (Academic course sponsored by the Ministry of Agriculture, Israel.), completed a course in Fish Disease (Nir David National Laboratory for Fish Disease, Israel) and obtained a diploma in International Marketing from the Israel Export Institute.

Mr. Ben Israel is an expert in fish marketing and served as the marketing manager of  “Dag She’an” a leading fish processor in Israel today’s name “Delidag”). Mr. Ben Israel has managed, consulted and overseen many fish farming initiatives for over thirty-five years in Israel, Jamaica, Nigeria, Ghana, Togo, Colombia, Brazil, Ecuador.
Mr. Ben Israel planned and constructed a red Tilapia fish farm in Jamaica – called “AQUALAPIA”.
The annual production of the farm was 4,000 tons of fish. Later on, Mr. Ben Israel managed the farm for three years.

In the past 15 years, Mr.Ben Israel is involved in fish- farming (Tilapia and Catfish) in Africa, especially in West Africa.

Uri Ben Israel is a senior fish farming consultant and is widely recognized as a leading consultant in the fish farming business. He now has over thirty-five years of experience in fish farming and has worked on many projects worldwide. He has extensive experience in developing commercial production methods for the intensive and semi-intensive culture of fish farming in the tropics. His practice includes consultation in farm design, technological innovation, production methods, disease control, training and processing- plant design. In addition, he has extensive experience in operations and general project- management issues.
Mr. Ben-Israel got his start, working for 16 years on the Bet-Alfa (Israel) Fishing Industries farm, working his way to management. In the interim he graduated from the Ruppin Institute (Business Administration), went on to earn diplomas in Aquaculture (Academic course sponsored by the Ministry of Agriculture, Israel.), completed a course in Fish Disease (Nir David National Laboratory for Fish Disease, Israel) and obtained a diploma in International Marketing from the Israel Export Institute.

Mr. Ben Israel is an expert in fish marketing and served as the marketing manager of  “Dag She’an” a leading fish processor in Israel today’s name “Delidag”). Mr. Ben Israel has managed, consulted and overseen many fish farming initiatives for over thirty-five years in Israel, Jamaica, Nigeria, Ghana, Togo, Colombia, Brazil, Ecuador.
Mr. Ben Israel planned and managed a red Tilapia fish farm in Jamaica – called “AQUALAPIA”.
The annual production of the farm was 4,000 tons of fish.

In the past 15 years, Mr.Ben Israel is involved in fish- farming (Tilapia and Catfish) in Africa, especially in West Africa.

Mr. Ronen Sander M.Sc.

Operations  Director & Market Research

Mr. Sander holds an M.Sc. in Agricultural Economics from the University of Aberdeen, Scotland.
The subject of Mr. Sander M.Sc. project, “Optimal Allocation of Limited Water Resources between Fish Farming and the Cotton Crop in Kibbutz Nir David” analyzed the marginal diminishing return of the limited resource, water.

Mr. Sander undergraduate degree, “Agricultural Practical Engineering”, is from Rupin College, Israel, with a major in Field and Orchard Crops.

For more than five years, Mr. Sander was managing director of an international multi-million dollar R&D initiative, a joint venture with Merck KGaA, Germany and scientific cooperation with the Volcani Agricultural Research Center, Israel.

Mr. Sander has specialized in emerging markets, focusing on agricultural project analysis, feasibility studies, and business planning. He directed the evaluation and design of Aquaculture initiatives in Ethiopia, Nigeria, Ghana, Eastern Europe, and Israel.

Contact:

Phone: 972-52-5554731

Mr. Shaul Oren

Civil  Engineer

Mr. Oren is an experienced in hydraulic engineering – General planning and detailed design.

Mr. Oren was operating and managing his own irrigation design and installation company, in California, USA.

Mr. Oren Graduated With Honors his Master’s Degree, Civil Engineering – Hydrodynamics and Water Resources, from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology

He workes in different areas of hydraulic engineering – mostly involving brackish water reverse osmosis (BWRO) desalination, aquaculture and fish raising projects, water supply systems, agricultural systems, pumping systems etc. For several years Mr. Oren worked mostly for Mekorot (the Israeli National Water Company).

currently, he is run his own business designing hydraulic and civil engineering projects, which includes:

  • Aquaculture and fish raising farms
  • Brackish water (BWRO) desalination and water supply systems
  • Agricultural irrigation systems
  • Pumping, Borehole, Wells, pipelines, etc.

Posted on

FR Page D’accueil

Tilapia Fish Farming

AQUACULTURE EN AFRIQUE, C’EST NOTRE AFFAIRE

Contactez nous >>

Tilapia, Catfish, Carps …

Concrete Tilapia Pond

“Au ALPHALAPIA, Nous apportons la combinaison du savoir-faire de la tradition de l’aquaculture, les marchés de poisson et l’agriculture des pays africains et asiatiques dotés de la technologie et du savoir occidental”

                                         Uri Ben Israel, CEO

Alphalapia produit de l’exploitation piscicole de la plus haute qualité. Nous utilisons des techniques agricoles modernes et des équipements associés à des méthodes de plus en plus minutieux. Une surveillance attentive de toutes les exploitations agricoles assurer à nos clients qu’ils recevront meilleurs produits. 

Nous travaillons avec tous les aspects de la pisciculture (aquaculture) Consulting et marketing 

Si vous êtes impliqué dans une opération d’aqua-agriculture et souhaitez améliorer votre entreprise ou vous envisagez de démarrer une entreprise de pisciculture, Alphalapia (Israël) a l’équipe de professionnels expérimentés pour fournir des solutions à presque tous les besoins des professionnels de l’industrie du poisson. 

Alphalapia analyse chaque initiative en fonction de ses besoins, en mettant l’accent sur ​​l’approche du marché, l’efficacité de la production et les préoccupations environnementales.

Blog

Tilapia Fish Farm in Africa

Tilapia fish farm example in Africa, tilapia fishtilapia farming, tilapia, tilapia pond, farm tilapia, male tilapia, aquaculture, Nile Tilapia, home tilapia farming, female tilapia, fish, farmed fish, tilapia culturetilapia fingerlingsmozambique tilapia, fingerlings, farmed tilapia, pond, tilapia recipes, Blue Tilapia

Contactez nous >>

Posted on

Is salmon a good choice for my first mini fish farm in South Africa?

Salmon, though an excellent market fish, is a large undertaking for an inexperienced farmer or low scale trial. Although The breeding of this kind of fish is nearly equal trout, these fish require some time living in the ocean. This means they may require additional facilities to get them there, depending on the location of the fish farm.

This is why we promote Tilapia as the perfect fish for most easy care and production.

I am looking to venture into aquaculture industry in Tanzania and require professional guidance with regards to a business plan to help me determine if aquaculture is a business that is worth investing into under the current investment climate in Tanzania, and if so what would be the species to be farmed. As currently, the most common is catfish and Tilapia.

Posted on